Challenging Manager Personalities, Psychology

angry leader

There are challenging psychological developments that people must deal with, and these developments impact the work they do in the various occupations. When it comes to occupations where people are in a position of leadership, the stability of one’s personality plays an even more important role. In order to improve one’s ability to manage effectively, one must understand the challenging manager personalities, what an impact the various personalities can have on one’s own work, and how can one improve upon the weaknesses inherent within the various personalities.

Some possible psychological developments that can happen in today’s leaders will be discussed. The discussion of various manager personalities will provide insight into the potential behaviours that are sometimes part of the profession.

Narcissistic Managers – In some people, there is a very strong desire to be different than others, to stand out and to be unique. When those ideas are too intense, narcissism can result. Depending on severity of the narcissism, this type of manager may; exploit the workers, display their status often, disregard the feelings of others, take the center stage regularly, act entitled, reject criticism, and take other’s ideas and represent them as their own. In today’s corporate world, some narcissism can be advantageous and useful. For example: narcissists have a positive self-image, they are competition oriented, and they can assert themselves against attackers.

Depressive Managers – The depressive manager has feelings of guilt, powerlessness, sadness, and inhibition. This type of manager may not like to make decisions and even dislike the idea of responsibility. Depressive managers focus on maintaining the satisfaction of people, and sometimes, this can come at the cost of performance. They may focus on maintaining a happy and harmonious team, and sometimes that may conflicts with the business objectives. These managers need to focus on achieving performance metrics rather than maintain their focus on the overall satisfaction and happiness of people.

Detached Managers – Managers, which are detached, will pursue moments of isolation. They do not have a strong need to be a part of and maintain a social network. They will not associate with anyone, and if they do, they will be very careful whom they choose. They often don’t seem very interested and they maintain their distance from others.

Suspicious Managers – Suspicious managers can be very vigilant, distrustful, cautious, paranoid, secretive and even hostile. With these managers, little events or insignificant situations can be blown out of proportion and become a big deal.

Dramatic Managers – Dramatic managers may exaggerate stories and achievements. This behaviour stems from a need to impress others and attract attention. Sometimes, they can keep employees dependent upon them and even exploit them.

Relationship Managers – Relationship managers like the idea of connection. They like the idea of getting others involved and working with people in teams. Some of the challenges these managers may face are; they may have a difficult time opposing people they know and they may be vulnerable to someone taking advantage of them.

Compulsive Managers – There are positives and negatives associated with the compulsive manager. Though they are perfectionists, they are also inflexible. Though they are very systematic in their approach, they can avoid basing things on emotion. Also, they may feel a need of control of things and people. So when it comes to dealing with subordinates, they are dominant, but when it comes to dealing with superiors, they are submissive. There are other downsides. These managers may have a tough time in adapting to organizational change, due to the rigidity and dislike of dealing with uncertainty.

 

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